Social Media Tips Marketing Experts Won’t Tell You

Within the last 5 years since the social media networks dominated the internet, there have been over 1 billion social media users. If you are a business, this is a massive potential to gain audience reach. If you can use the right technique with the help of experts on social media marketing Brisbane has today, you could find new business and improve profit margin.

But how do you reach that end? You can find an expert on social media marketing Brisbane has to offer that will share you these marketing secrets:

Always Express Gratitude

Businesses that express their gratitude to their customers often tend to have repeat customers. When customers support your business, it means they like the product or service that you have to offer. When they support your business, always say “thank you” in however manner you wish to deliver that message. By expressing your gratitude, your followers will feel more special. Plus, people will always be drawn to those who are polite to them. it will give them that extra incentive to support you even more! Check Digital8 for more details.

Bonus Tip: Even though you might find it time-consuming to thank every single one of your followers or customers, you must invest that time. Do not automate responses. People prefer a real human response.

Create a Unique Hashtag

A hashtag is a word or phrase that is followed by a pound sign that identifies messages on social media within that same topic. It is recommended by social media experts as one of the best tools in social media marketing. But in order for your business to stand out in your campaign, you need to create your own unique hashtag. There are two-fold benefits to this: 1) you can reinforce your brand and 2) you can spark up a conversation about your brand on social media.

Encourage User-Generated Content

This is a very effective (and one of the fastest growing) method for social media marketing. It is a great way to encourage your customers to share photos or posts about your products to their network. Hence, they become an advocate for your brand online! At the same time, since these are people who have used or bought your product, there is a lot of authority in their voice!

Work on Your Website

Most online business owners only use the social media as leverage to spread the word about their website. Hence, you have to hire the best web design firm that will help you create a beautiful and user-friendly website. If you did not put much effort into searching for the best web design company, all your efforts will go down the drain as the people you brought into your website (from social media sites) will not be interested.

Finding a company that offers the best web design in Brisbane, as well as experts on social media marketing Brisbane has today, is a smart first step. If you want to integrate your web design with your marketing efforts, go to http://digital8.com.au. They have professionals who can help you out!

Your broadband provider can use your smart devices to spy on you

How much of your privacy would you trade for a smarter home? Internet service providers (ISPs) can peek at the internet-connected devices people use in their own homes – baby monitors, TV set-top boxes, vibrators – even when those devices are specifically set up to protect users’ privacy.

“These home devices are also home surveillance devices,” says Peter Swire at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta.

We’ve known that for a while, but concerns were generally directed at outsiders, like people spying on our baby monitors, or hackers coaxing our internet-connected devices to join in a distributed denial of service attack.

But in the wake of policy changes in the US earlier this year, people began to wonder who else could start using our data for profit. In March 2017, the US legislature voted to repeal Obama-era rules that would have prevented ISPs from selling personal information to third parties and given users more power over what information they shared with ISPs.

Hidden power
“ISPs are in the most powerful position in terms of having data that they could sell on,” says Brent Mittelstadt at the Oxford Internet Institute, UK. Metadata – information about how and when someone is accessing the internet, but not about what they send or receive – is valuable because it is relatively easy to analyse and contains insights into an individual’s lifestyle.

In the US, ISPs are allowed to use or sell data they collect about their users’ internet use and histories. Do our smart devices broadcast yield any bankable information?

To find out, Noah Apthorpe at Princeton University and his colleagues set up a mock smart home, complete with seven internet-connected devices, to find out what they might reveal about their users.

Four of the devices, the team found, could be easily identified by ISPs just because of the way they connected to the internet. That might not be a problem when it comes to an Amazon Echo, which immediately revealed its identity. But now that everything from insulin pumps to vibrators comes with internet connectivity, just knowing what gadgets someone is using could be valuable information to advertisers.

Jigsaw of habits
Encrypted connections are one way of preventing the amount of information that an ISP can gather about its users. Website addresses that begin with “HTTPS” encrypt their traffic so although an ISP or other network observer could see that a user had visited a particular website, they wouldn’t be able to work out which specific pages they visited or what they did on that website.

And encryption doesn’t stop ISPs from knowing which internet-of-things devices their users have, nor does it stop them seeing when we use those devices. In the Princeton study, ISPs could track a user’s sleep patterns by detecting when a sleep tracker was connecting to the internet. It also revealed that ISPs could identify when a home security camera detected movement and when someone was watching a live stream from their security camera.

The authors say there might be ways to cut down the snooping abilities of ISPs. One possible defence involves deliberately filling a network with small amounts of traffic. This could be done by running all your internet traffic through a VPN and then programming the VPN to record and play back that traffic even when the IOT device is not in use, making it tricky for ISPs to work out when a particular device is actually being used. However, this would probably slow down the network, making it a somewhat impractical defence against network observations.

Ultimately, Mittelstadt says, it’s up to consumers to weigh up the privacy risks that come along with using internet-connected devices. But it’s hard for us to make informed decisions when it’s not at all clear what kinds of data ISPs are collecting, or how they’re using the data. “There’s a lot of uncertainty around that data,” he says.

This type of observation is possible anywhere, but in the US there are few restrictions on what data ISPs are allowed to sell. EU law makes it more difficult for ISPs to do similar things, and the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation should protect UK citizens.

Modern technology is changing the way our brains work

Human identity, the idea that defines each and every one of us, could be facing an unprecedented crisis. It is a crisis that would threaten long-held notions of who we are, what we do and how we behave.  It goes right to the heart – or the head – of us all. This crisis could reshape how we interact with each other, alter what makes us happy, and modify our capacity for reaching our full potential as individuals.  And it’s caused by one simple fact: the human brain, that most sensitive of organs, is under threat from the modern world

Unless we wake up to the damage that the gadget-filled, pharmaceutically-enhanced 21st century is doing to our brains, we could be sleepwalking towards a future in which neuro-chip technology blurs the line between living and non-living machines, and between our bodies and the outside world.

It would be a world where such devices could enhance our muscle power, or our senses, beyond the norm, and where we all take a daily cocktail of drugs to control our moods and performance.

Already, an electronic chip is being developed that could allow a paralysed patient to move a robotic limb just by thinking about it. As for drug manipulated moods, they’re already with us – although so far only to a medically prescribed extent.

Increasing numbers of people already take Prozac for depression, Paxil as an antidote for shyness, and give Ritalin to children to improve their concentration. But what if there were still more pills to enhance or “correct” a range of other specific mental functions?
What would such aspirations to be “perfect” or “better” do to our notions of identity, and what would it do to those who could not get their hands on the pills? Would some finally have become more equal than others, as George Orwell always feared?

Of course, there are benefits from technical progress – but there are great dangers as well, and I believe that we are seeing some of those today.

Living With a Computer

If I were looking for a simple program, I’d stick with The Electric Pencil—which I am forced to do in any case, since nothing new on the market will run in my poor obsolescent SOL. Or I might choose Magic Wand, which is simpler to use than many of today’s complicated programs. If you’re looking for sophistication, I’d suggest you pass by WordStar to choose between two other programs. One of them, Perfect Writer, is available by mail from Perfect Software, Inc., 865 Conger Street, Eugene,Oregon 97402. (The other programs are available from computer stores for prices between $200 an ‘ d $400.) It is so sophisticated that one might as well be operating a nuclear reactor, but it does things I’ve seen nowhere else. For example, it allows you to divide the screen with a horizontal line, display one document in the top half and another in the bottom, and move material from one document to the other. It also has a bigger variety of printing formats than most other programs.

The other choice would be Scripsit 2. 0, which is put out by Radio Shack and runs on its TRS-80 Model II computer. (Confusing nomenclature: the TRS-80 Models I and III are the cut-rate versions, while the Model II is the serious business machine.) I had snobbishly resisted Radio Shack because of the low-rent appearance of its products, but I was forced to the conclusion that, all in all, Scripsit is the best program on the market. To give one example, it allows you to program up to twenty keys with your own commands. If you press one key, it might print your return address in the upper corner of the page; press another, and it can perform a search-and-replace routine you often use. Like many other programs, Scripsit can also include a spelling-checker, which proofreads documents and is a godsend to the careless typist.

My Picks: If money were no object, I’d buy an IBM Displaywriter, which is the prettiest of all the models and has the simplest commands.

Money being an object, I would vacillate helplessly among the TRS-80 Model II with an extra 8″ disk-drive and Scripsit 2.0, the Xerox 820 with two 8″ drives and Perfect Writer, and the DECmate. And yet, a year from now, when its software has caught up with it, I’d expect to be choosing the IBM Personal Computer. If I received a small bequest, I’d also buy an Osborne I—if the bequest were large, an Otrona—to take on the road. For any of these systems (not including the Osborne), I’d spend no more than $6, 000, or half as much as for the Displaywriter.

Godspeed as you follow this advice; meanwhile, I’ll be spending nothing, sticking with SOL and The Electric Pencil, and hoping for a world in which my sons can grow up to have a better computer than their father had.